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Semiotics - A Handbook on the Sign-Theoretic Foundations of Nature and Culture


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Edited by Roland Posner, Klaus Robering, Thomas A. Sebeok
Three volumes

Introduction

1. Volume 1:
27,0 x 19,0 cm. XXXIV, 1198 pages. With 200 pictures and 16 color charts. 1997.  DM 998,-/öS 7.285,-/sFr 888,-; approx. US$ 624.00 ISBN 3-11-009584-X

I.   Systematics
II.    General Topics I: Aspects of Semiosis - Channels, Media, and Codes
III.   General Topics II: Types of Semiosis
IV.   Methods of Semiotics
V.    The Historiography of Semiotics
VI.   History of Western Semiotics I: Celtic, Germanic, and Slavic Antiquity
VII.  History of Western Semiotics II: Ancient Greece and Rome
VIII. History of Western Semiotics III: The Middle Ages

2. Volume 2: 27,0 x 19,0 cm. Approx. 1.000 pages. Approx. DM 820,-/öS 5.986,-/sFr 730,-; approx. US $ 513.00 ISBN 3-11-015661-X

IX.  History of Western Semiotics IV: From the Renaissance to the Early 19th Century
X.   History of Western Semiotics V: From the 19th Century to the Present
XI.  History of Non-Western Semiotics
XII. Current Trends in Semiotics

3. Volume 3: 27,0 x 19,0 cm. Approx. 1.200 pages. Approx. DM 990-/öS 7.227,-/sFr 881,-; approx. US $ 619.00 ISBN 3-11-015662-8

XIII.  Semiotics and Other Interdisciplinary Approaches
XIV.  Semiotics and Individual Disciplines
XV.   Selected Topics of Semiotics
XVI. Appendix

Linguistics and Communication Science Handbook series 13.1, 13.2, 13.3; Introduction

Walter De Gruyter & Co. http://www.degruyter.de/

Introduction

Every human being uses signs and is involved in sign processes. Every society has developed ideas on how signs enable humans to orient themselves in their environment and deal with each other. Every language contains a rich vocabulary of words for traces, symptoms, cues and clues; for indications, utterances, and expressions; for symbols, interpretations, and models; for information, interaction, and communication.

The established academic disciplines have long neglected the common properties of the various sign types on which their unified theoretical analysis could be based. The human and social sciences have studied the signs used in language, literature, art, music, law, and religion independently of each other, and consequently lost sight of their unitary character. The engineering and natural sciences have adopted a mechanistic approach to nature and life, and have thereby led the industrial and post-industrial societies into problems which they can no longer overcome with the means provided by these sciences.

However, it is feasible to conceive of sign processes in all their variations as a unitary phenomenon connecting living nature with human culture and distinguishing them both from inanimate nature. This conceptualization may serve as a key to providing the human, social, engineering and natural sciences with a common theoretical basis for welldefined division of labor and cooperation.

It is feasible to regard human behavior in all cultures as sign production and reception. Following this approach, life in family and profession, commerce and administration, art and religion can be understood in a unified way and studied in all its transdisciplinary aspects.

Semiotics has made this its task. After important beginnings in Antiquity and the Middle Ages, it established itself as a scientific enterprise in the Age of Enlightenment and has developed several efficient conceptual approaches in the last hundred years. These have been elaborated into components of formal theory in recent decades. The focal relevance of semiotics for the reorganization of academic disciplines and for the interlinked analysis of nature and culture has led to increasingly urgent demands for a comprehensive presentation of its history and systematics.

The Semiotics Handbook  presents in three volumes containing 178 articles written by 175 authors from 25 countries the current state of research in general, descriptive, and applied semiotics and gives a comprehensive overview of sign conceptions in philosophy, aesthetics, logic mathematics, grammar, stylistics, poetics, music, architecture, the fine arts, medicine, physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, sociology, economics, religion, and everyday life.

Part A (Chapters I-IV) provides a theory-based outline of the entire field of semiotics in 31 articles.

Part B (Chapters V-XI) complements this systematic account of semiotics by offering, in 68 articles, a unique survey of implicit semiotic thought in the most important cultures of the world and through the successive epochs of Western history.

Part C (Chapter XII) describes, in 23 articles, the various trends currently operative within semiotics.

Part D (Chapters XIII and XIV) comprises 36 articles that analyze the possibilities of a systematic reconstruction of the sign-related university disciplines and interdisciplinary approaches on a semiotic basis.

Part E (Chapter XV) contains 18 articles on selected sign problems in contemporary industrial and post-industrial societies. All of them are treated only marginally or not at all in the context of current university disciplines.

Part F (Chapter XVI) supplies semiotic practitioners with a series of concrete professional tools. It surveys semiotic institutions and organizations and provides semiotic reference sources and periodicals for the reader's convenience. The person and subject index allow the use of the book both as encyclopedia and dictionary.

With this array of offerings, the Handbook addresses the following groups of readers:

  • experts in semiotics who wish to extend their historical or systematic knowledge
  • scholars in the individual disciplines who wish to assess the value and potential of their discipline within the framework of the traditional arts and sciences
  • practicing artists in various fields who wish to consider their activities as sign production
  • readers interested in culture who wish to appreciate human behavior in everyday life as sign use
  • everyone interested in the relationship between nature and culture.


Its extensive subject matter, its transparent organization, and its didactic treatment make the Handbook well suited as a basis for university courses and seminars in semiotics, the history of culture, the philosophy of science, and the disciplines mentioned above.

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Volume 1

Preface

>I. Systematics

1. Roland Posner, Semiotics and its presentation in the Handbook
2. Roland Posner / Klaus Robering, Syntactics
3. Klaus Robering, Semantics
4. Roland Posner, Pragmatics

>II. General Topics I: Aspects of Semiosis - Channels, Media, and Codes

5. Martin Krampen, Models of semiosis
6. Klaus Landwehr, The optical channel
7. Gerhard Strube / Gerda Lazarus,  The acoustic channel
8. Herbert Heuer, The tactile channel
9. Jürgen Kröller, Chemical channels
10. Peter Moller, The electric and magnetic channels
11. Kurt Brück, The thermal channel
12. Niels Galley, The organization of eye movements: A case study of multichannel semiosis
13. Riccardo Luccio, Body behavior as multichannel semiosis
14. Karin Böhme-Dürr, Technical media in semiosis
15. Terry Threadgold, Social media of semiosis
16. Gavin T. Watt / William C. Watt, Codes
17. Rudi Keller / Helmut Lüdtke, Code change

>III.General Topics II: Types of Semiosis

18. Thomas A. Sebeok, The evolution of semiosis
19. Thure von Uexküll, Biosemiosis
20. F. Eugene Yates, Microsemiosis
21. Thure von Uexküll / Werner Geigges / Jörg M. Herrmann, Endosemiosis
22. Gunda Kraepelin, Mycosemiosis
23. Martin Krampen, Phytosemiosis
24. Werner Schuler, Zoosemiosis
25. Franz M. Wuketits, Anthroposemiosis
26. Peter Bøgh Andersen / Per Hasle / Per Aage Brandt, Machine semiosis
27. Günter Tembrock, Environmental semiosis

>IV. Methods of Semiotics

28. Wolfgang Balzer, Methodological problems of semiotics
29. Rüdiger Grotjahn, Data and hypotheses in semiotics
30. Jerzy Pelc, Theory formation in semiotics
31. Jerzy Pelc, Understanding, explanation, and action as problems of semiotics

>V. The Historiography of Semiotics

32. Harald Haarmann, The development of sign conceptions in the evolution of human cultures
33. Aleida Assmann, Problems in the explication of Western sign conceptions
34. Umberto Eco, History and historiography of semiotics
35. Marcelo Dascal / Klaus D. Dutz, The beginnings of scientific semiotics

>VI. History of Western Semiotics I: Celtic, Germanic, and Slavic Antiquity

36. Harald Haarmann, Sign conceptions in Celtic Antiquity
37. Klaus Düwel, Sign conceptions in Germanic Antiquity
38. Walter Koschmal, Sign conceptions in Slavic Antiquity

>VII.  History of Western Semiotics II: Ancient Greece and Rome

39. Ezio Pellizer, Sign conceptions in pre-classical Greece
40. Karlheinz Hülser, Sign conceptions in philosophy in Ancient Greece and Rome
41. Pirmin Stekeler-Weithofer, Sign conceptions in mathematics in Ancient Greece and Rome
42. Giovanni Manetti, Sign conceptions in grammar, rhetoric, and poetics in Ancient Greece and Rome
43. Albrecht Riethmüller, Sign conceptions in music in Ancient Greece and Rome
44. Alexandros Ph. Lagopoulos, Sign conceptions in architecture and the fine arts in Ancient Greece and Rome
45. Volker Langhoff, Sign conceptions in medicine in Ancient Greece and Rome
46. Giovanni Manetti, Sign conceptions in natural history and natural philosophy in Ancient Greece and Rome
47. Fritz Graf, Sign conceptions in religion in Ancient Greece and Rome
48. Wolfgang Schindler / Detlef Rößler, Sign conceptions in everyday life in Ancient Greece and Rome

>VIII. History of Western Semiotics III: The Middle Ages

49. Stephan Meier-Oeser, Sign conceptions in philosophy in the Latin Middle Ages
50. Françoise Baré, Sign conceptions in aesthetics in the Latin Middle Ages
51. George Molland, Sign conceptions in mathematics in the Latin Middle Ages
52. Stephen F. Brown, Sign conceptions in logic in the Latin Middle Ages
53. Markus H. Wörner, Sign conceptions in grammar, rhetoric, and poetics in the Latin Middle Ages
54. Franco Alberto Gallo, Sign conceptions in music in the Latin Middle Ages
55. Hans Holländer, Sign conceptions in architecture and the fine arts in the Latin Middle Ages
56. Costantino Marmo, Sign conceptions in medicine in the Latin Middle Ages
57. Ludger Kaczmarek, Sign conceptions in natural history and natural philosophy in the Latin Middle Ages
58. Rudolf Suntrup, Sign conceptions in religion in the Latin Middle Ages
59. Klaus Frerichs, Sign conceptions in everyday life in the Latin Middle Ages
60. Franz Tinnefeld, Sign conceptions in the Greek Middle Ages
61. Claude Gandelman, Sign conceptions in the Judaic tradition

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Volume 2

>IX. History of Western Semiotics IV: From the Renaissance to the Early 19th Century

62. Stephan Meier-Oeser, Sign conceptions in general philosophy from the Renaissance to the early 19th century
63. Ursula Franke, Sign conceptions in the philosophy of art and aesthetics from the Renaissance to the early 19th century
64. Wolfgang Lenzen, Sign conceptions in logic from the Renaissance to the early 19th century
65. Jürgen Trabant, Sign conceptions in the philosophy of language from the Renaissance to the early 19th century
66. Eberhard Knobloch, Sign conceptions in mathematics from the Renaissance to the early 19th century
67. Josef Rauscher, Sign conceptions in grammar, rhetoric, and poetics from the Renaissance to the early 19th century
68. Mario Baroni, Sign conceptions in music from the Renaissance to the early 19th century
69. Josef Rykwert / Desmond Hui, Sign conceptions in architecture and the fine arts from the Renaissance to the early 19th century
70. Roger French, Sign conceptions in medicine from the Renaissance to the early 19th century
71. Wolfgang Deppert, Sign conceptions in natural history and natural philosophy from the Renaissance to the early 19th century
72. Rainer Volp, Sign conceptions in religion from the Renaissance to the early 19th century
73. Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Sign conceptions in everyday life from the Renaissance to the early 19th century

>X. History of Western Semiotics V: From the 19th Century to the Present

74. Adelhard Scheffczyk, Sign conceptions in general philosophy from the 19th century to the present
75. Sign conceptions in aesthetics from the 19th century to the present
76. Denis Vernant, Sign conceptions in logic from the 19th century to the present
77. Karl-Friedrich Kiesow, Sign conceptions in the philosophy of language from the 19th century to the present
78. Klaus Mainzer, Sign conceptions in mathematics and informatics from the 19th century to the present
79. Andreas Dörner, Sign conceptions in grammar from the 19th century to the present
80. Christiane Pankow, Sign conceptions in rhetoric, stylistics, and poetics from the 19th century to the present
81. Eero Tarasti, Sign conceptions in music from the 19th century to the present
82. Desmond Hui / Josef Rykwert, Sign conceptions in architecture and the fine arts from the 19th century to the present
83. Wolfgang U. Eckart, Sign conceptions in medicine from the 19th century to the present
84. Ulrich Majer, Sign conceptions in physics from the 19th century to the present
85. Franz M. Wuketits, Sign conceptions in biology from the 19th century to the present
86. Leonhard Bauer, Sign conceptions in economy from the 19th century to the present
87. Hermann Deuser, Sign conceptions in religion from the 19th century to the present
88. Winfried Nöth, Sign conceptions in everyday life from the 19th century to the present

>XI. History of Non-Western Semiotics

89. Antonio Loprieno, Sign conceptions in the Ancient Middle East
90. Fedwa Malti-Douglas, Sign conceptions in the Islamic World
91. Joachim Fiebach, Sign conceptions in Non-Islamic Africa
92. Bimal Krishna Matilal / Jogesh Chandra Panda, Sign conceptions in India
93. You-Zheng Li, Sign conceptions in China
94. Harald Haarmann, Sign conceptions in Korea
95. Yoshihiko Ikegami, Sign conceptions in Japan
96. Kurt Huber, Sign conceptions in Indonesia and the Philippines
97. Harald Haarmann, Sign conceptions in the mainland cultures of South East Asia
98. Gunter Senft, Sign conceptions in Oceania
99. Andreas König, Sign conceptions in the Ancient Americas

>XII. Current Trends in Semiotics

100. Helmut Pape, Peirce and his followers
101. Svend Erik Larsen, Saussure and his followers
102. Pirmin Stekeler-Weithofer, Frege and his followers
103. Sandra B. Rosenthal, Phenomenological Semiotics
104. H. Walter Schmitz, Significs
105. Kurt Baldinger, Semasiology and Onomasiology
106. Rainer Hegselmann, Logical Empiricism
107. Gerrit Haas, Constructivism
108. Ursula Niklas, Praxiology
109. Rom Harré, Wittgenstein and Ordinary Language Philosophy
110. Thure von Uexküll, Jakob von Uexküll and his "Umweltlehre"
111. Heinz Paetzold, Cassirer and his followers
112. Robert E. Innis, Bühler and his followers
113. Dieter Münch / Roland Posner, Morris, his predecessors and followers
114. Rainer Grübel, Russian Formalism
115. Thomas G. Winner, Prague Functionalism
116. Linda R. Waugh / Stephen Rudy, Jakobson and Structuralism
117. Jørgen Dines Johansen, Hjelmslev and Glossematics
118. Michael Fleischer, The Moscow-Tartu School
119. Herman Parret, Greimas and his school
120. Giampolo Proni, The position of Eco
121. Søren Kjørup, The approach of Goodman
122. Peter Rusterholz, Poststructuralist semiotics

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Volume 3

>XIII. Semiotics and Other Interdisciplinary Approaches

123. Roland Posner, The relationship between individual disciplines and interdisciplinary approaches
124. Klaus Robering, Semiotics and the philosophy of science
125. Helmar Frank, Semiotics and information theory
126. Herbert Stachowiak, Semiotics and systems theory
127. Reinhard Köhler, Semiotics and synergetics
128. Alexandre Métraux, Semiotics and the theory of developmental processes
129. Michael Stadler / Wolfgang Wildgen, Semiotics and gestalt theory
130. Irene Berkel, Semiotics and psychoanalysis
131. Oliver Scholz, Semiotics and hermeneutics

>XIV. Semiotics and Individual Disciplines

132. Roland Posner, The semiotic reconstruction of individual disciplines
133. Pirmin Stekeler-Weithofer, Semiotic aspects of mathematics
134. Andreas Kamlah, Semiotic aspects of physics
135. Dieter Hellwinkel, Semiotic aspects of chemistry
136. Felix Schmeidler, Semiotic aspects of astronomy and cosmology
137. Kenneth E. Foote, Semiotic aspects of geography
138. Jesper Hoffmeyer, Semiotic aspects of biology: Biosemiotics
139. Andreas Müller / Joachim R. Wolff, Semiotic aspects of neurophysiology: Neurosemiotics
140. Peter Hucklenbroich, Semiotic aspects of medicine: Medical semiotics
141. John A. Michon / Janet L. Jackson, Semiotic aspects of psychology: Psychosemiotics
142. Hans-Georg Soeffner / Hans Hagen Hildebrandt, Semiotic aspects of sociology: Sociosemiotics
143. Bernard S. Jackson, Semiotic aspects of jurisprudence: Legal semiotics
144. Hartmut Kliemt, Semiotic aspects of economics
145. Pertti Ahonen, Semiotic aspects of political science: Political semiotics
146. Mauro Wolf, Semiotic aspects of mass media studies
147. Luisa Passerini / Antonis Liakos, Semiotic aspects of the historical disciplines
148. Klaus Frerichs, Semiotic aspects of archeology
149. Jörg Peters, Semiotic aspects of linguistics: Semiotics of natural languages
150. Michael Titzmann, Semiotic aspects of literary studies: Semiotics of literature
151. Erika Fischer-Lichte, Semiotic aspects of the performing arts
152. Guerino Mazzola, Semiotic aspects of musicology: Semiotics of music
153. Rolf Kloepfer, Semiotic aspects of film studies: Semiotics of the cinema
154. Omar Calabrese, Semiotic aspects of art history: Semiotics of the fine arts
155. Claus Dreyer, Semiotic aspects of the study of architecture: Semiotics of architecture
156. Volker Heeschen, Semiotic aspects of ethnology and social anthropology: Ethnosemiotics
157. Donald J. Cunningham, Semiotic aspects of pedagogy
158. Eckhard Tramsen, Semiotic aspects of religious studies: Semiotics of religion

>XV. Selected Topics of Semiotics

159. Friedrich Kittler, The history of communications technology
160. Yishai Tobin, Divination and futurology
161. Peter Bøgh Andersen / Berit Holmqvist, Work
162. Gunter Gebauer, Sport
163. Paul Bouissac, Interspecific Communication
164. Philip B. Stafford, Gerontology and Geriatrics
165. Bennetta Jules-Rosette, Tourism
166. Ute Werner, Business
167. Augusto Ponzio, Ideology
168. Karl Grammer, Body signals in human interaction
169. Ernest W.B. Hess-Lüttich, Multimedia communication
170. Søren Kjørup, Pictograms
171. Eva-Maria Baxmann-Krafft / Bernd Hartlieb, Standardization of signs for trade and industry
172. Umberto Eco, Fakes in arts and crafts
173. Antonio Tadiotto, Ciphers and other secret codes
174. José Lambert / Clem Robyns, Translation
175. Peter Mühlhäusler, Universal languages and language planning
176. Richard Berendzen / Bernard M. Oliver, Extraterrestrial communication

>XVI. Appendix

177. Gloria Withalm, Semiotic organizations
178. Gloria Withalm, Semiotic reference works and periodicals
Index of persons
Index of subjects

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Series

Linguistics and Communication Science Handbooks

Edited by Hugo Steger and Herbert Ernst Wiegand

As of now, 26 reference books are planned to appear in the series: those dealing with Dialectology, Historical Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, Computational Linguisties, Dictionaries, Semantics, Philosophy of Language, Linguistic Disorders and Pathologies, Syntax, Writing and Its Use, Name Studies, and Contact Linguistics have already been published. After the handbook of Semiotics, which is presented here, reference books on the following topics will be published at regular intervals: Morphology, Languages for Special Purposes, History of Language Sciences, Media Science, Lexicology, Language Typology, Textlinguistics, Science of Translation, German as a Foreign Language, Romance Historical Linguistics, Dependency and Valency, and the Nordic Languages.

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